Sunday, September 11, 2011

Loading by Daniel Supanik

'Loading" begins with a man unwinding a reel of film. Suddenly it cuts to an assortment of other images - some taken from a 1950's talk show, other from a cheesy preview for a 1950's horror film. The rest of the film is quick jumpy cuts from the man winding and unwinding the film to the 1950's pieces. During the film you hear interspersed sound bytes of the 1950's trailer, the 50's talk show, and the sound of film running in and out. They start and stop abruptly.

I enjoyed this film because of all the ones in the set that I saw, it had the least narrative quality.I don't even think of it as a narrative, but more like a symbol (for lack of a better word). The way I saw it - this film is supposed to represent loading in the modern day and age; whether it be a song on itunes, or the screen of an illegal film on the internet. The frenetic cutting and imagery of this film show how absurd our impatience at waiting for something to load. If we were trying to load actual film, the point would be moot. Impatience would only hinder us and make us fumble the film, like we see the man in this film do.

I also think that this should be considered a work of art. Stripped of any meaning or interpretation, this film would be captivating to look at or experience. The rapid cutting is shocking and bizarre, the winding and unwinding of the film is mysterious, and all of the frames of the film mashed together don't even have to mean anything, nor should they.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is very interesting.

Anonymous said...

The action of winding and unwinding a film reel to present ideas within the movie seems like a very interesting idea.

Anonymous said...

I like how you said that a film without a narrative can still be a valid work of art, despite the fact that it doesn't follow standard conventions.

Kortney Hetherington said...

This was well written and very insightful. I appreciate you.

Anonymous said...

good analysis.